Month: February 2015

The Body Farm: A Life After Death

While I have made reference to the lore of one Body Farm around Percy Priest Lake before, I’d like to also tell you about a very real Body Farm in Knoxville that is purposefully FULL of gore. The University of Tennessee’s forensics department and CSI teams from around the world get first-hand experience while studying decomposition of bodies just by going to the 2.5 acre peaceful “farm” down the Alcoa Highway. There they can take their pick of over 100 rotting bodies placed in crime scene scenarios that have been exposed to the elements for varying amounts of time. Graphic (obvious) warning: these pictures are not for the weak.

There is nothing nefarious about how the bodies came to the research facility. Wikipedia cites that the facility receives over 100 bodies each year, of which 60% are donated by family members. You can however pre-register yourself if you want to be a part of this highly respected forensics program. Their policy is here, and for questions, contact:

Dr. Lee Meadows Jantz
Coordinator of the Forensic Anthropology Center
Department of Anthropology
250 South Stadium Hall
Knoxville, TN 37996-0760
Phone: (865) 974-4408
E-mail: donateinfo@utk.edu

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The Tale of the Wampus Cat

Monsters in America

It all started with “chest of drawers.” My particularly accented East Tennessee friend threw her head back at brunch and giggled that she used to think that a dresser (pronounced “chester-dra-wers”) was named after a man named Chester, and she always wondered who this Chester was and why he had so many drawers.

I just wondered why in the hell my family didn’t just call it a dresser?  We talked and talked until we got to “catawampus” and not a one of us could confidently define it, only what we had heard it in relation to. Of course, the first dispute was what the actual word was, and according to Wikipedia there is quite a range:

  • catawamptious
  • catawampous
  • cattywampus
  • cattywampous
  • caliwampus
  • caliwampous
  • cankywampus
  • kittywampus
  • gittywampus
  • skiwampus

For a ridiculous word, why the variation? What’s up with the cats? Was there a cat? Can wampus be a verb? It sent me in a downward spiral which in truth, does not lead to a very interesting etymology (probably old Norse or Scandanavian for crooked).

However, it did lead to some interesting Tennessee lore about the Wampus Cat…

In the hills of Tennessee skulks a creature – half mountain cat, half woman who walks on two legs and howls in the night. The woman was once the most beautiful Cherokee in all the land named Running Deer.  Running Deer’s husband, Great Fellow, went hunting one night to slay the evil spirit Ewah. He came back wild and half crazy, leaving Running Deer to angrily confront Ewah.  She wore the mask of a wildcat on her face for protection and fought viciously and bravely.  Due to her courage, she assumed the role of guardian against all evil spirits on the land. Running Deer is still believed by the Cherokee to protect the sacred hunting ground surrounding her home in East Tennessee, and spark fear in the hearts of white men across the Smoky Mountains.

Many believe that Running Deer is the Wampus Cat, whose legend spans all of East Tennessee.  Everyone’s got some drunk uncle or ex-boyfriend’s mom who has seen The Wampus Cat over there – although the tale of the Wampus Cat is slightly different.  The Wampus Cat was still a Cherokee woman, but she became so as punishment.  She snuck out to her husband’s hunting trip disguised in skins of a wildcat and overheard stories of magic that were only reserved for men.  The medicine man fused the skins to the woman and she was forced to live as an outcast.

Always in the dead of night, the Wampus Cat appears screeching and howling with giant yellow glowing eyes and huge wildcat paws. The Wampus Cat is also known as a harbinger of death for once one hears her cry, someone will die within the next three days.

Have you seen or heard the Wampus Cat?